News and Comments

ImmunoGen: No Exaggeration.

  Thursday, April 07, 2011

NO. It was not exaggerated, nor sophisticated what we wrote time and time again about the unparalleled safety and efficacy of the ImmunoGen’s Targeted Antibody Payload (TAP). It is no exaggeration announcing our conviction that cancer products based on Immunogen’s TAP   technology will generate billions of dollars in revenues. What we talked about has, indeed, become today’s great news.  More...

ImmunoGen: Steadfast Determination to Conquer Cancer

  Wednesday, April 06, 2011

The Program Committee of the 102nd Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) taking place in Orlando, FL designated ImmunoGen’s (IMGN) cancer drug IMGN853 poster presentation “Highly Rated.” More...

PROLOR: The Added Value Of Reversible PEGYlation

  Wednesday, March 30, 2011

When Professor Irving Boime and his team at Washington University in St. Louis observed that human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) has a longer half life than other natural hormones, researchers’ curiosity led them to discover that a carboxyl terminal peptide (CTP) linked to the hormone molecule increases its half life. Experimenting with CTP on other proteins left no doubt in the minds of the researchers that linking Nature’s CTP to protein therapeutics could be safe and effective in extending their half-life. When it comes to reproduction, Mother Nature does not err and does not cause harm. It selected CTP to link to the hormone, which without it, pregnancy would have never been possible. Read also The Value of CTP Technology  More...

SANGAMO: THE NEXT PINNACLE IN HIV TREATMENT?

  Monday, March 07, 2011

When the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was identified as the cause of the mysterious immune system depletion characterized by horrific vulnerability to infection, multiple dreadful symptoms and ultimately death, the world panicked. The medical and research communities were taken by surprise. Nothing could be said or done to help the agonizing victims or prevent their imminent death. It took a few years to introduce the first HIV drug, a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI). This milestone was followed by the development and marketing of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI), then a third class antiretroviral protease inhibitors (PIs). As HIV continued to reproduce and resistant variants of the virus emerge, It became necessary to combine the antiretroviral drugs in what has become known as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Indeed, the HAART combination resulted in profound reductions in AIDS morbidity and mortality.  More...

No Role For Serendipity In Vertex' achievements

  Saturday, February 26, 2011

Bad firms do not design and develop chains of breakthrough drugs. Serendipity exists, no doubt about it, but it has no role in Vertex’ (VRTX) accomplishments. Vertex’ products are backed by plenty of science and technologies that are highly appreciated by academia and by well regarded scientists. The time has come for the market analysts to let Vertex’ shareholders share the benefits this firm has offered AIDS patients, patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), and now, as we have just learned from the news, cystic fibrosis patients.  More...

Regeneron: A Sound, Well-Executed Strategy

  Tuesday, February 22, 2011

When Regeneron (REGN) was a development stage firm, it spent a substantial time in developing and validating a solid scientific, technological and industrial infrastructure. At its inception, Regeneron’s vision was to provide a self-sufficient capability for discovering and developing far-reaching breakthrough products. Its strategy for its therapeutic discovery has been to establish a solid foundation that enables it to build its pipeline product through in house genomic technology for understand functional gene expression. Its drug design strategy focused on creating a novel approach, which would enable controlling signaling proteins, whose excesses cause cell deregulation. The strategy focused also on designing human monoclonal antibodies that are far-reaching, time consuming and impacting. Until the time these technologies were put in place and was validated, REGN served as a vehicle for daily trading. Both positive and negative players benefited from the yo-yoing of the stock. Stock investors and analysts are not impressed with breakthrough technologies created by development stage biotech firms until they are validated. Otherwise, they consider them untested, hence, not credible and not trustable for long-term investing.  More...

EXELIXIS: A MODEL OF SUCCESSFUL DEVELOPMENT-STAGE BIOTECH FIRMS

  Monday, February 14, 2011

Small development-stage biotechnology firms are still facing serious extrinsic problems. The challenges come not from their managements, technologies and products, but from the negative investors who incessantly bet against firms either without justification, or based on premature and superficial judgment of new molecular entity drugs aiming at unusual targets. A couple of weeks ago, to make its point that betting on the biotech firms is risky, the Barron’s picked up on this issue, stating that short sellers can negatively impact biotechnology companies, especially those that have yet to market their first product.  More...

CYTOKINETICS’ NEW PLAN WITH AMGEN INCREASES THE DOSE OF OPTIMISM TOWARDS THE H.F. DRUG.

  Sunday, February 06, 2011

In the news, Cytokinetics (CYTK) announced that, in the first half of 2011, the company and Amgen (AMGN) have agreed to initiate a Phase IIb clinical trial of an intravenous formulation of omecamtiv mecarbil for patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction hospitalized for acute heart failure. Amgen will conduct the trial in collaboration with Cytokinetics.  More...

ARIAD’s drug Ridaforolimus did it again

  Monday, January 24, 2011

Like almost all genuine development-stage biotech companies, Ariad (ARIA) took years to design its ambitious products, develop them, perfect them, find the right partners for its lead drug, and develop the best strategy for achieving its vision. As the years went by without tangible positive financial figures or timetabled promising forecasts, many investors replaced confidence with skepticism, and sold ARIA.  More...

XOMA AND ELAN: THE TALE OF TWO COMPANIES

  Tuesday, January 11, 2011

The tale, this time, is not about London and Paris and is not written by Charles Dickens in 1859. It is about two biotech firms, Xoma (XOMA) and Elan (ELN), written by the market in the 21st century. The similarity between the old and the new tales is the furry the constituents of the two cities and companies have against their rulers’ mismanagement.  More...


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